Question: Is It Polite To Say You’Re Welcome?

How do you say your welcome professionally?

How do English-speakers say “you’re welcome” in different parts of the world?My pleasure.

This is probably the most formal and gracious option on the list.

Not at all.

Don’t mention it.

Happy to help.

No problem/Not a problem.

No worries.

Anytime.

It’s nothing.More items….

How do you say welcome for thank you?

10 English Phrases for Responding to “Thank You”You’re welcome.No problem.No worries.Don’t mention it.My pleasure.Anytime.It was the least I could do.Glad to help.More items…

How do you say you’re welcome in a sweet way?

Alternatives to Saying ‘You’re Welcome’ in a Text or Direct MessageThe pleasure is all mine.It is my pleasure!You’re very welcome.Glad to help!The feeling is mutual.I am happy to be of assistance.No need at all.That’s what good colleagues do.More items…•

Is it polite to say you’re welcome?

When used graciously, “you’re welcome” is a perfectly polite form of expression. “‘No worries, sure, of course, and no problem'” are acceptable in a more casual atmosphere and among close friends and family,” Parker explains. “But I always prefer the traditional way of saying ‘You are welcome.

Is it rude to not say you’re welcome?

It is not rude not to say “you’re welcome” after a compliment. When “thank you” is the initiating phrase, your response should be “you’re welcome” or any substitute of that which seems most appropriate; however, when the initiating phrase is a compliment, “you’re welcome” becomes the response.

How do you respond to thanks for coming?

Originally Answered: How do I respond when someone says to me, “Thanks for coming”? You can say, no problem/I really appreciate your greeting/ my pleasure / thanks and so on.

How do you write your welcome?

People often make the mistake of writing Your Welcome when it should be You’re Welcome! Since they both sound the same, it’s easy to make such an error. A good way to remember is to use “you’re” when it’s appropriate to say “you are”.

Is Anytime a good response to thank you?

A person who says “anytime” in response to a thank-you is saying that (s)he is willing to help at anytime. … It’s just a saying, informal use. In translation, you’re saying “you’re welcome. It wasn’t a bother or problem at all.

Are welcomed to attend?

When followed by “to + verb”, the version with “welcomed” is not grammatically possible. For example, “Anyone is welcome to attend” is fine, but “Anyone is welcomed to attend” is wrong. In certain constructions, most of which I’d guess are fairly uncommon, “Anyone is welcomed” is correct.

Is it correct to say you are welcome?

After someone thanks you, the correct phrase is “you’re welcome,” not “you’re welcomed.” In the previous example, welcome is used as an adjective. Welcome can also serve as a verb (We welcome the summer!) or as an interjection (Welcome!), usually stated when greeting someone.

When to say it’s my pleasure?

You can say ‘It’s a pleasure’ or ‘My pleasure’ as a polite way of replying to someone who has just thanked you for doing something. ‘Thanks very much anyhow. ‘—’It’s a pleasure. … ‘—’My pleasure.

What can I say instead of you’re welcome?

Here are a few more ways to say “You’re welcome” in English.You got it.Don’t mention it.No worries.Not a problem.My pleasure.It was nothing.I’m happy to help.Not at all.More items…•

Why shouldn’t you say you’re welcome?

When you do a favor, and someone says “thank you,” the automatic response is “you’re welcome.” It’s a basic rule of politeness, and it signals that you accept the expression of gratitude—or that you were happy to help. But according to one leading psychologist, this isn’t the best choice of words.

Can you say you are most welcome?

You may also hear people say, “You’re very welcome” or “You’re most welcome,” although both sound a little formal to me. I tend to use them in writing more than speaking because you don’t have that extra context that intonation provides. You’re very welcome. You’re most welcome.

Why do Millennials say no worries?

“No problem, however, is used because younger people feel not only that helping or assisting someone is a given and expected but also that it should be stressed that your need for help was no burden to them (even if it was).”

What is the meaning of you’re most welcome?

In “You’re most welcome” it isn’t saying “most” as in “more than the others”. It’s saying “to the greatest extent”. I suppose if you are thanking several people, but only one of them was actually helpful, you could say, “You’re the most welcome”, but it would come across as mean or sarcastic.